The True/False Film Fest brings together approximately 40,000 attendees every March for a weekend of music, art and the best in documentary film. The University of Missouri is in the center of the festivities. Mizzou hosts film screenings in locations such as Jesse Auditorium, the Missouri Theatre and the Rhynsburger Theatre. Students, faculty and staff take part in parades, parties, panels, volunteer opportunities and the Gimme Truth documentary film game show. And in the days preceding the festival, the School of Journalism hosts Based on a True Story, a a conference celebrating documentary filmmaking.

Photos of Jimi Hendrix, calendars and other papers on a wall over a mattress.

Documentary filmmakers Bill and Turner Ross created an installation replicating their home studio space when they were filming “Western” in Texas. The installation, on display in the School of Journalism’s Walter Williams Hall, was a central point of focus for the Based on a True Story conference March 2.

Student looking at maps, charts and other papers tacked to a wall.

Kellan Marvin, a senior in the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism, observes the “Western” studio space installation.

Parade

The March March, one of the highlights of True/False Film Fest, attracts several thousand attendees. Columbia locals, visiting filmmakers and students dress in whimsical costumes and parade through downtown Columbia to kick off the weekend’s events.

Michael Cali and Jackie Bell

Senior photojournalism major Michael Cali and photojournalism Professor Jackie Bell walk in the March March.

Big heads and parade people in costumes.

Giant papier-mâché likenesses of True/False Film Fest “co-conspirators” David Wilson and Paul Sturtz make an appearance at the March March.

Boy and man in mad scientist costumes.

A father-and-son mad scientist duo lead the parade toward Broadway.

Woman holding balloons while looking at cell phone.

Charlotte Cook, co-creator of documentary unit Field of Vision, holds balloons at the March March Parade to help publicize the premiere of Mizzou alumnus Nathan Truesdell’s documentary short Balloonfest.

People in costumes.

An attendee of the March March looks out to the crowd.

Guy in bell bottoms and an afro wig on roller skates.

Costumes showcased at the March March vary from Victorian dresses to hippy roller-skater attire.

Student with bass drum.

Marching Mizzou has become a staple musical act at the March March.

Percussionists in costumes.

Members of Marching Mizzou perform outside the Missouri Theatre.

Student clapping.

True/False sustainability volunteer and MU student Mackenzie Mock cheers on the musicians.

Game contestants gather on stage.

Junior documentary journalism students Suzy Lubell, Jessie King, Bella Graves and Rachel Tiedemann present their short film to celebrity judges Steve James, Amanda Lipitz and Khalik Allah at the Gimme Truth competition. The goal of the competition is to make a two-minute video about something true or false with the goal of fooling the judges.

Student and judges.

Maggie Noble gets positive reactions from the celebrity judges at Gimme Truth. The judges all are world-renowned directors, of Steve James’ Hoop Dreams, Amanda Lipitz’s Step and Khalik Allah’s Field Niggas.

Judges holding T and F signs.

Amanda Lipitz, director of Step, shows her disbelief of a film by holding up the False sign at Gimme Truth.

Man with microphone, student behind podium.

Steve Gieseke, a senior journalism student, is teased by Gimme Truth host Brian Babylon.

Students talking to host.

Graduate student Will Linhares presents his short film about a Don Quixote collector’s book.

Student, host, three judges.

MU senior Lily FitzGibbons answers questions from the judges at Gimme Truth.

Frame from a movie showing a man and a woman on a couch.

MU student Lily FitzGibbon’s film, Noah and Sophia, is about two musicians who have created tunes from kitchen appliances.

Student holding award shaped like a film reel.

Lily FitzGibbon takes the prize for best Gimme Truth film.

Musicians.

Musicians perform at Buskers Last Stand, the final concert of True/False.

Big crowd of volunteers in front of a movie screen.

The True/False Film Fest core team, which spends a year planning the festival, is honored before the I Am Not Your Negro final screening at the Missouri Theatre.